Wine education: Italy and US compared [pictures]

wine education
I recently posted about a pamphlet that our six-year-old son brought home from school equating wine and pot.

A friend living in the Veneto, Italy writes in with this comparison:

I thought I would share the work that our son brought home from his Montessori pre-school today: filastrocca del vino. A page of rhyming verse about making grapes into wine. Followed by pages to color about grapes + wine including a smiling Chianti bottle. Their fall learning unit was covering varietals through learning about grapes.

After the jump, find the text of the rhyming verse and a couple more pics (no joints).
filastrocca

Here is the rhyming verse (see more here and a loose translation here).:

FILASTROCCA DEL VINO

DALLA PERGOLA NASCE L’UVA:
PRIMA E’ ACERBA POI MATURA.
LA RACCOGLIE IL CONTADINO
E LA SCHIACCIA DENTRO IL TINO.
BOLLE IL MOSTO GIORNO E NOTTE,
POI FINISCE NELLA BOTTE.
NELLA BOTTE SI RIPOSA
FINCHE’ E’ VINO COLOR ROSA.
DOPO TANTE SETTIMANE
VA A RIEMPIR LE DAMIGIANE,
MA LI’ DENTRO NON VUOL STARE:
ORA E’ PRONTO DA INFIASCARE.
PER LA FESTA DI FAMIGLIA
PASSA POI NELLA BOTTIGLIA;
NEI BICCHIERI VIEN VERSATO
E DA TUTTI E’ BEN GUSTATO.

pixel

20 Responses to “Wine education: Italy and US compared [pictures]”


  1. This is a great example of the negative attitudes to alcohol that pervade in the US and to a lesser extent in my homeland of the UK. But I’d be willing to bet there are more alcoholics per capita in both the UK and the US than in Italy… Can anyone substantiate my claim or am I talking out of my hash-pipe?


  2. This is a slightly better translation by myself:

    From pergola grapes born
    before is unripe then is ripe.
    The farmer pick it up
    and crush it in the vat.
    The must boil day and night
    then it ends in the barrel.
    In the barrel it rests
    until it’s pink colour wine.
    After many weeks
    goes to fill the demijohns.
    But there, it doesn’t want to stay
    now it’s ready to bottle.
    For the family’s feast
    then it pass into the bottle;
    in glasses it’s been poured
    and from all it’s been tasted.

    It’s not perfect (not easy for me to translate a poem as I’m Italian!) but it’s better than google translate!


  3. And in school our children learn a lot of old poems about wine and usually once a year they also goes to visit farms and they can discover “live” the wine production chain. At my friend’s son school they also produced their own wine with children and they bring it home to us for tasting!


  4. Great post. I think that an argument could easily be made that much of the abuse of alcohol (esp. binge drinking) in the US results from the negative attitudes or taboo ascribed to it. Parents, let your kids be taught reading, writing and math by their teachers; don’t let schools educate them about alcohol, morality, etc.


  5. A learning unit devoted to grape varietals? That’s civilized.


  6. I see a lot of unruly kids that could use a glass of wine (or sippy-cup of wine) instead of the sugar drinks their parents give them……..


  7. [...] Chianti: Visual comparison of wine education in Italy and the [...]


  8. Cheferia – Andy: thanks for the translation–much better than googletranslate! And great stories from Italian schools.

    @Richard and @Sean – It does seem that alcoholism in America (and perhaps the UK) is more diagnosed than it is in Europe. I wonder if the rates are really different and if so what explains it? Different cultures of consumption? Longer histories of production? Or overdiagnosis in America? A complex issue to be sure…


  9. Upon further inspection of both publications; I’m now more concerned over the lack of skilled draftsmanship in the American example. It not only says that Italy appreciates wine, it also appreciates better art!


  10. I grow up helping my father crushing grapes in my little winery in Italy and every adults in my family drinks wine during lunch and dinner. They are never drunk and they teach kids about wine and health. I think is all about education and responsibility.


  11. All You Need Is Wine is the prefect party game to entertain your guests, and makes a great gift. It is a blind wine tasting party game. Check it out at http://www.allyouneediswine.com.


  12. It’s pretty interesting to think about children learning about the wine making process. I think in the states alcohol is often so taboo that it becomes more of a problem then elsewhere in the world….or maybe it is the lack of centralized downtowns and public transportation!


  13. My Italian husband, Claudio, started drinking wine at age 5 — usually mixed with water, sometimes added to soup. But wine was a fixture on the family dinner table. “Every Italian table has bread and wine to start, and then the rest would follow,” Claudio always says.

    As a special treat for the kids, Claudio’s uncle, a trattoria owner, would take a plate of snow and mix it with red wine and sugar to make a Barbera or Dolcetta snow cone. Viva italia!


  14. Statistics say that the average french adults consume a little too much alcohol. Might be the same for Italy.

    However, countries with prohibition like Sweden and USA seem to have even more problems.

    Good education imho is much better than prohibition.


  15. It’s a striking difference from your earlier post. Not to mention, her son did a great job with the coloring exercise.


  16. [...] The good doctor is pumped about little Italian kids getting wine themed coloring projects. [Dr. Vino] [...]


  17. [...] or free monthly updates by email (right sidebar). Thanks for visiting!In our recent discussion of wine education for kids, two readers thoughtfully provided translations of an Italian rhyming verse (”Filastrocca del [...]


  18. I think a big difference b/w Italy (& France, Spain, Portugal, &…) & US wine consumption is the association w/ food. I’ve never heard of Italians getting together at a bar to slam drinks. Even at wine bars. I’ve seen Italians have a bit too much, but almost never so hammered that they are vomiting and passing out. The alcohol simply isn’t the focus – it’s the food and company. It also helps that the vast majority of the wines are gentler – an Italian neighbor I spoke w/ yesterday was rolling his eyes at the strength of a 13.5% cab franc.


  19. Premiere site on British National FoodPremiere site on British National Dish…

    [...]Wine education: Italy and US compared [pictures] | Dr Vino's wine blog[...]…


  20. I can confirm, alcohol here isn’t the focus, rather being together in good company. My father uses to drink a glass of wine at lunch, and a bit more when he’s with his friends; all in all, it seems that it helps him fighting cholesterol (he almost hasn’t got any). I use to drink some wine too, not much because I can’t handle it past one glass, but I really enjoy it and I consider it an integral part of my italian roots. May I share with you a nice poem we usually study in elementary school, not specifically wine-related, but which shows the still strong connection we have on country-life:

    San Martino

    La nebbia a gl’irti colli
    piovigginando sale,
    e sotto il maestrale
    urla e biancheggia il mar;

    ma per le vie del borgo
    dal ribollir de’ tini
    va l’aspro odor dei vini
    l’anime a rallegrar.

    Gira su’ ceppi accesi
    lo spiedo scoppiettando:
    sta il cacciator fischiando
    su l’uscio a rimirar

    tra le rossastre nubi
    stormi d’uccelli neri,
    com’esuli pensieri,
    nel vespero migrar.

    I found this translation, which is quite accurate (the author is unknown, unfortunately)

    San Martino

    Drizzling, the fog
    the steep hills climbs,
    and the northwest wind torments
    the howling, foaming sea:
    but in the village streets
    the seething vats send forth
    the pungent smell of wine
    and cheer the weary souls.
    On fiery logs the roast
    turns on its spit and crackles;
    the hunter stands and whistles
    and watches from his door
    the flocks of birds that,
    back upon reddish clouds,
    like forlorn thoughts gyrate
    at dusk, preparing to migrate.


winepoliticsamz

Wine Maps


Classes

My next NYU wine classes: NYU

Recent Comments

Recent Posts

See my op-eds in the NYT
"Drink Outside the Box"
"Red, White, and Green"

Highlights

Monthly Archives

Categories


Blog posts via email


@drvino








Wine industry jobs

quotes

One of the “fresh voices taking wine journalism in new and important directions.” -World of Fine Wine

“His reporting over the past six months has had seismic consequences, which is a hell of an accomplishment for a blog.” -Forbes.com

"News of such activities, reported last month on a wine blog called Dr. Vino, have captivated wine enthusiasts and triggered a fierce online debate…" The Wall Street Journal

"...well-written, well-researched, calm and, dare we use the word, sober." -Dorothy Gaiter & John Brecher, WSJ

jbf07James Beard Foundation awards

Saveur, best drinks blog, finalist 2012.

Winner, Best Wine Blog

One of the "seven best wine blogs." Food & Wine,

One of the three best wine blogs, Fast Company

See more media...

ayow150buy

Wine books on Amazon: